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Home - How To Condition Your Players For Rebounding




  How to condition your players for rebounding



When it comes to basketball rebounding, more often than not it’s the relentless players who get the ball the most. After all, rebounds usually don’t come straight at a player, and they’re not always caught the first time.

So, the players who keep after the ball are usually the best rebounders.

Want proof? Look at Dennis Rodman, arguably one of the best rebounders in the game. Every game, he’d continue to go after and tip the ball until all the other players would give up. Then, he’d get it.

To do this game after game, he had to be in serious good shape.

One of the most important aspects to basketball rebounding is strength training. There are many benefits to having more strength. Strong players can make paths or lanes in the game far easier than weaker ones. And, stronger players get injured less often.

Strength also gives players stamina, which means they can go hard for a much longer period of time during the game.

When it comes to rebounding, your players need to start a strength and conditioning program if they want to be successful.

Here are some tips you can use to get started:

Start Conditioning Early - Athletes should work on conditioning year-round. It’s vital that you give your team chances to work out through the year. You can do this by using open gym, hosting leagues in the summer, etc. And, make sure your players know they have these options, and also what your expectations are.

Stop Sprinting - Sounds counterproductive, we know. Why would you stop sprints when conditioning is your goal? Well, that time your team spends doing sprints and suicides can be better used practicing defense or shooting.  Instead of just sprinting, try to work conditioning into several drills, so that players are doing several things at once.


Push Your Team - Your players need to give practice their all. Just because it’s practice doesn’t mean they can slack! Treat practice with the same importance as a game.

Give Your Players A Plan - Make sure that every one of your players has a unique strength and conditioning plan they can follow. This is so they are always improving their strength. You could include things like conditioning drills, weight training, ect.

If you want your players to play hard during games, and to do it play after play, then they must have the proper strength and conditioning to carry them through. If you stress how important these two elements are, your team will pick up on it and start to care as well.





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